the wonder is we can see these trees, and not wonder more

Penny Rock woods near Grasmere in Autumn

Ralph Waldo Emerson’s words have never left me – when I find myself among trees they seem to always come back.

And the more that is being discovered about trees, the more wonder they seem to instil: their ability to communicate with one another in a variety of ways, the rich and very complex but very efficient system of soil, microbes and roots that works as an interconnected community, the transformation of light into food, and the incredible ability to draw water from roots to the tips of a tree. And then there’s just the feeling of standing beneath a tree, or leaning in to it. What does it make you feel?

The Lake District has some beautiful ancient woodlands and many wood pastures where some of the trees are extremely old. There are also many programmes involving planting and management of land to encourage natural regeneration. We’ll be thinking more about trees in June, but of course every time we go out for a walk, every time we look out of the window, there are trees, and the birds that go with them. And a cause to wonder.

The following images were taken over the first few months of this project. One, the single, beautiful, blossoming hawthorn was made yesterday.

Trees are awesome!

winter trees Ennerdale
winter trees Ennerdale
Spring wood in Troutbeck valley
Spring wood in Troutbeck valley
Lone ash on the Dales Way above Bowness
Lone ash on the Dales Way above Bowness in May. Ash are usually the last to burst into leaf.
Copper beech on the Coffin Route near Grasmere
Copper beech on the Coffin Route near Grasmere
Birch woods on the shore of Ullswater below Place Fell
Birch woods on the shore of Ullswater below Place Fell
Hawthorn in blossom near Skelwith Fold, Langdale
Hawthorn in blossom near Skelwith Fold, Langdale
Spring larch at Whinlatter Forest
Spring larch at Whinlatter Forest

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